Whippany, New Jersey Revolutionary War Sites
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REVOLUTIONARY WAR SITES IN WHIPPANY, NEW JERSEY

Whippany NJ Historic Sites
WHIPPANY MARKER
Revolutionary War - Whippany NJ Revolutionary War New Jersey
Revolutionary War New Jersey Revolutionary War New Jersey
Whippany in the Revolutionary War

Whippany Marker
Next to Molly Malone's Restaurant
Rt. 10 and Troy Hills Rd.
Map / Directions to the Whippany Marker
Map / Directions to all Whippany Revolutionary War Sites

A historic sign stands at this intersection to commemorate Washington's headquarters in Whippany in June 1780, after the Battle of Springfield. However, when one reads through Washington's letters written during his stay in Whippany, it becomes apparent that the text on the sign is a bit confusing and misleading.

In actuality, Washington arrived in Whippany on the evening of June 23 (The Battle of Springfield had occurred earlier in the day) and headquartered here until the 25th. He wrote a number of letters during this time which are marked as "Headquarters, Whippany."  While he does mention the North River (another name for the Hudson River) in a letter on the 23rd, it was in reference to moving supplies there: "The flour and salted meat except what the Commissaries think necessary for the daily consumption of the army will go to New Windsor [in New York] on the North River." [1] 

After leaving his Whippany Headquarters, he went to the Henry Doremus house in present day Montville.

Revolutionary War Sites in Whippany
ROCHAMBEAU ENCAMPMENT MONUMENT
"... Whippany will be a good place for a halt..."

Heritage Park - Whippany NJ
Whippany in the Revolutionary War

Rochambeau Encampment Monument
Heritage Park
Whippany Rd.
Map / Directions to the Rochambeau Encampment Monument
Map / Directions to all Whippany Revolutionary War Sites

A boulder plaque at the entrance of Heritage Park commemorates the encampment of General Rochambeau and his 5,000 French troops on August 27 and 28, 1781, on an area from here northeast toward the Whippany River. [2]

On August 7, Washington had written to General Rochambeau, recommending the route he should take with his troops over roughly a ten-day period. After listing the detailed day-by-day plan, Washington noted, "I have named no halting day because we have not a moment to lose, and because the Troops will more than probably, be detained sometime at Trenton; but if you should think it absolutely necessary, Whippany will be a good place for a halt, as there is a good road leading from thence through Chatham (five Miles distant) to Elizabeth Town and Staten Island." [3]

Rochambeau did in fact halt here on August 27 and 28. An exchange of letters occurred on the 27th between Washington in Chatham and Rochambeau in Whippany.

Washington wrote:
"By intelligence which I have received since my arrival at this place, I find that the enemy have been throwing Troops upon Staten Island. This circumstance, and a desire of bringing up the rear of the two Armies will induce me to halt the American Troops one day at Springfield, as I pray your Excellency to do those of the French at Whippany." [4]

Rochambeau replied:
"I have this moment received the letter of Your Excellency. I am making a halt here pursuant to your orders with the First Division which will be joined by the Second Division tomorrow afternoon. I am awaiting your orders to march the whole [army] the day after tomorrow. As far as I am concerned I shall join Your Excellency at that place which you shall think proper to set in order to precede our troops to Philadelphia and to make the necessary preparations." [5]

As the boulder monument plaque notes, "After resting, they marched rapidly southward in parallel with American troops led by General George Washington to Yorktown, Virginia. There, on October 19, 1781, the combined armies forced the surrender of British General Lord Cornwallis in the final major battle of the American Revolution." [6]

Revolutionary War Sites in Whippany
WHIPPANY BURYING YARD
Revolutionary War Cemetery - Whippany NJ Whippany NJ Revolutionary War Historic Sites
Whippany NJ Revolutionary War Historic Sites Whippany NJ Revolutionary War Sites
Whippany in the Revolutionary War Whippany NJ Revolutionary War Sites
Whippany NJ Revolutionary War Whippany NJ Revolutionary War
Jockey Hollow - Whippany NJ Whippany NJ during the Revolutionary War
Whippany NJ during the Revolutionary War Whippany Burying Yard
Whippany in the Revolutionary War Whippany NJ in the Revolutionary War
Whippany NJ in the Revolutionary War
Whippany in the Revolutionary War Whippany NJ in the Revolutionary War
Revolutionary War sites in Whippany NJ Revolutionary War sites in Whippany NJ
Whippany in the Revolutionary War Revolutionary War sites in Whippany NJ
Revolutionary War New Jersey Revolutionary War New Jersey

Whippany Burying Yard
Rt. 10 East, just passed the Troy Hills Rd. intersection
Next to JR Cigars
Map / Directions to the Whippany Burying Yard
Map / Directions to all Whippany Revolutionary War Sites

The Whippany Burying Yard was established in 1718. [7]  It contains the graves of at least 11 Revolutionary War soldiers.[8] 

David Bates
1725 -September 7, 1820
Captain, NJ Militia

Lindsley Burnet
November 27, 1746 - January 8, 1818

Matthias Burnet Jr.
April 13, 1749 - May 27, 1811
1st Sgt, NJ Militia

David Cory
1747- May 14, 1811
Private, Continental Line

Abraham Fairchild
November 2, 1753 - July 4, 1843
Corporal, NJ Militia

Jared Kelley
April 7, 1764 - July 3, 1822
Private, 2nd Regiment NJ Militia

Uzal Kitchell
Born 1746 - Died January 22, 1813
Private, NJ Militia

Stephen Munson
1733 - November 8, 1805
Captain, Continental Line

Joseph Tuttle
March 10, 1728 -September 16, 1800
Private, NJ Militia

Timothy Tuttle
September 28, 1748 -June 15, 1816
Captain, NJ Militia

Timothy C. Ward
Died March 13, 1816, age 80

Montclair New Jersey - Revolutionary War Sites

Source Notes:

1. ^George Washington letters from June 23 - 25, 1780, marked as from "Headquarters, Whippany"
George Washington; Edited by John C. Fitzpatrick, George Washington Bicentennial Edition / The Writings of George Washington, Volume 19 (Washington: United States Government Printing Office, 1937) p. 59-72       Available to be read at the Internet Archive here.
There are several letters shown that are dated June 23, 1780, sent from Rockaway. Washington's one letter from Whippany that is dated June 23, is marked as being written at 11 PM, which shows Washington must have arrived in Whippany later in the day.
Several other letters are marked as being from Whippany, dated June 24 and 25
"The flour and salted meat..." quote is from Washington's letter to Major Richard Clairborne. While this letter was written on June 23, it is marked as being from Rockaway, and so was written before Washington arrived at Whippany.

2. ^ Township of Hanover historic sign

3. ^ George Washington letter to General Rochambeau, August 17, 1781
George Washington; Edited by John C. Fitzpatrick, George Washington Bicentennial Edition / The Writings of George Washington Volume 23 (Washington: United States Government Printing Office, 1937) p. 6-7
Available digitized at the Internet Archive here.

4.  ^ George Washington letter to General Rochambeau, August 27, 1781
George Washington; Edited by John C. Fitzpatrick, George Washington Bicentennial Edition / The Writings of George Washington Volume 23 (Washington: United States Government Printing Office, 1937) p. 49-50
Available digitized at the Internet Archive here.

5.  ^Robert A. Selig, Ph. D, The Washington - Rochambeau Revolutionary Route in the State of New Jersey, 1781 - 1783 An Historical and Architectural Survey Volume I (Project Funding Provided by New Jersey Historic Trust Department of Community Affairs / State of New Jersey. Carl E. Nittinger - Project Director, 2006) p. 177    Available as a PDF here.
A footnote with the Selig paper says that his source for the Rochambeau letter was "Rochambeau Papers, Library of Congress, vol. 9."
The Rochambeau Papers are not currently available online.

6. ^ Township of Hanover historic sign

7. ^ 1718 date appears on three separate signs at the cemetery, including one placed by the Township of Hanover Historic Sites Committee, and one placed by the Township of Hanover Landmark Commission.

8. ^Names, dates, and ranks from gravestones and markers within the Whippany Burying Yard

Website Researched, Written, Photographed and Designed by Al Frazza
This website, its text and photographs are © 2009 -2017 Al Frazza. All rights reserved.