Piscataway, New Jersey Revolutionary War Sites
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REVOLUTIONARY WAR SITES IN PISCATAWAY, NEW JERSEY

Piscataway NJ Historic Sites
EAST JERSEY OLDE TOWNE
Including the Indian Queen Tavern

Piscataway in the Revolutionary War East Jersey Olde Towne
East Jersey Olde Town Indian King Tavern
Entrance to East Jersey Olde Towne
New Brunswick Barracks
   
East Jersey Olde Town
East Jersey Olde Town Indian King Tavern
Vanderveer House
The Indian Queen Tavern
East Jersey Olde Towne
1050 River Rd.
Map / Directions to East Jersey Olde Towne
Map / Directions to all Piscataway Revolutionary War Sites
For more information about East Jersey Old Towne,
including operating hours,
see the East Jersey Olde Towne Village Website

East Jersey Olde Towne contains buildings from the 1700's and 1800's. Several of the buildings have always stood here, but the majority of them originally stood in other locations and were moved here. Several of the buildings date to the Revolutionary War era, including the Indian Queen Tavern, which was originally located in New Brunswick. It has a particularly interesting history, having been visited by John Adams, Benjamin Franklin and George Washington.

On September 9, 1776, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, and Edward Rutledge reached New Brunswick while en route to Staten Island from Philadelphia. They had been sent by the Continental Congress to meet with British Admiral Richard Howe to discuss the prospect of peace negotiations. Because there were so few rooms available, Adams and Franklin were forced to share a room at the Indian Queen Tavern.

In his diary, Adams related an amusing story about this evening: (Adams' spelling, punctuation, and capitalization are left unchanged) [1]

"The Taverns were so full We could with difficulty obtain Entertainment. At Brunswick, but one bed could be procured for Dr. Franklin and me, in a Chamber little larger than the bed, without a Chimney and with only one small Window. The Window was open, and I, who was an invalid and afraid of the Air in the night [blowing upon me], shut it close. Oh! says Franklin dont shut the Window. We shall be suffocated. I answered I was afraid of the Evening Air. Dr. Franklin replied, the Air within this Chamber will soon be, and indeed is now worse than that without Doors: come! open the Window and come to bed, and I will convince you: I believe you are not acquainted with my Theory of Colds. Opening the Window and leaping into Bed, I said I had read his Letters to Dr. Cooper in which he had advanced, that Nobody ever got cold by going into a cold Church, or any other cold Air: but the Theory was so little consistent with my experience, that I thought it a Paradox: However I had so much curiosity to hear his reasons, that I would run the risque of a cold. The Doctor then began an harrangue, upon Air and cold and Respiration and Perspiration, with which I was so much amused that I soon fell asleep, and left him and his Philosophy together: but I believe they were equally sound and insensible, within a few minutes after me, for the last Words I heard were pronounced as if he was more than half asleep...."

The following day, they reached Perth Amboy, where they took a short boat ride across the water to meet with Howe in Staten Island. (See the Perth Amboy page for more details about that portion of their journey.)

Seven years later, in early December 1783, George Washington was honored with a dinner at the Indian Queen Tavern. [2] Just over a month earlier, General Washington, headquartered at Rockingham, had received news of the signing of the Treaty of Paris, which ended the Revolutionary War.

Piscataway NJ Revolutionary War Sites
CORNELIUS LOW HOUSE (MIDDLESEX COUNTY MUSEUM)
And

METLAR-BODINE HOUSE MUSEUM
Cornelius Low House - Piscataway NJ Cornelius Low House
Revolutionary War - Piscataway NJ
Piscataway in the Revolutionary War Metlar-Bodine House
Cornelius Low House - Built 1741
Metlar-Bodine House - Earliest portion built 1721

Cornelius Low House
1225 River Rd.
Map / Directions to the Cornelius Low House
Map / Directions to all Piscataway Revolutionary War Sites

For more information about the Cornelius Low House,
including operating hours, see the
Cornelius Low House / Middlesex County Museum Website

Metlar-Bodine House
1281 River Rd.
Map / Directions to the Metlar-Bodine House
Map / Directions to all Piscataway Revolutionary War Sites

For more information about the Metlar-Bodine House Museum,
including operating hours, see the
Metlar-Bodine House Museum Website

From December 1776 - June 1777, British and Hessian troops occupied New Brunswick. At that time, there was a small port village called Raritan Landing which was located along Raritan River where Johnson Park is now.  Raritan Landing suffered damage during this time from the occupying forces.  These two houses on River Road overlooked Raritan Landing. They are now both museums.

The historic marker that commemorates the site of Raritan Landing shown below, stands in Johnson Park along Landing Lane.

Raritan Landing
Raritan Landing
Revolutionary War Sites in Piscataway

Source Notes:

1. ^ John Adams Diary, September 9, 1776 entry:
“[Monday September 9, 1776.] ,” Founders Online, National Archives (http://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/01-03-02-0016-0187 [last update: 2015-12-30]). Source: The Adams Papers, Diary and Autobiography of John Adams, vol. 3, Diary, 1782–1804; Autobiography, Part One to October 1776, ed. L. H. Butterfield. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1961, pp. 417–420.

2. ^ The dinner honoring Washington at the Indian Queen Tavern likely took place on December 5 or 6, 1783. The following letters establish Washington's presence in New Brunswick on those days, and make it clear that the city was honoring him, although the letters do not specifically mention the Indian Queen Tavern.

“To George Washington from Minne Van Voorhees, 5 December 1783,” Founders Online, National Archives, last modified July 12, 2016, http://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/99-01-02-12147. [This is an Early Access document from The Papers of George Washington. It is not an authoritative final version.]

“To George Washington from John Neilson, 6 December 1783,” Founders Online, National Archives, last modified July 12, 2016, http://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/99-01-02-12149. [This is an Early Access document from The Papers of George Washington. It is not an authoritative final version.]

“From George Washington to John Neilson, 6 December 1783,” Founders Online, National Archives, last modified July 12, 2016, http://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/99-01-02-12150. [This is an Early Access document from The Papers of George Washington. It is not an authoritative final version.]

Website Researched, Written, Photographed and Designed by Al Frazza
This website, its text and photographs are © 2009 -2017 Al Frazza. All rights reserved.