Ewing, New Jersey Revolutionary War Sites
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REVOLUTIONARY WAR SITES IN EWING, NEW JERSEY

Revolutionary War Ewing New Jersey
BEAR TAVERN ROAD BOULDER MONUMENTS
Ewing NJ Revolutionary War Sites Historic Crossroad Park - Ewing NJ
Ewing NJ historic sites Revolutionary War New Jersey
Ewing, New Jersey Ewing NJ
Ewing NJ Revolutionary War Sites

Bear Tavern Road Boulder Monuments
Bear Tavern Rd. near Windybush Way (Monument shown above)
Bear Tavern Rd. near Upper Ferry Rd. (Monument shown left)
Map / Directions to Bear Tavern Road

After their Christmas night 1776 crossing of the Delaware River, General George Washington's army headed toward Trenton to attack the Hessian garrison there. After marching about a mile-and-a-half inland, they turned down Bear Tavern Road in Hopewell Township and crossed Jacobs Creek. They then continued along Bear Tavern Road through what is now Ewing.

These two boulder monuments mark the army's route along Bear Tavern Road, leading to the crossroads where Washington split his army into two columns. (See the Historic Crossroad Park entry below) [1]

Ewing New Jersey - Revolutionary War Sites
HISTORIC CROSSROAD PARK
Ewing NJ Revolutionary War Sites Historic Crossroad Park - Ewing NJ
Ewing NJ historic sites Revolutionary War New Jersey
Ewing, New Jersey Ewing NJ
Ewing NJ - Revolutionary War Revolutionary War in Ewing NJ

Historic Crossroad Park
Bear Tavern Rd. and Upper Ferry Rd
Map / Directions to Historic Crossroad Park

This small park commemorates an important location in the march of Washington's troops towards Trenton after their historic Christmas night 1776 crossing of the Delaware River. After traveling down Bear Tavern Road (see above entry), they reached a crossroads at about 7 a.m. at this location, in an area which was then called Birmingham and is now the West Trenton section of Ewing. It was at this crossroads that General George Washington divided his 2,400 troops into two columns to make a two-pronged attack on the Hessian garrison at Trenton.

A sign in the park describes the paths taken from here to Trenton by the two columns:
"One column under the command of General Nathanael Greene, approached the city from the northwest by way of Pennington Road. The other column, led by General John Sullivan, marched down the Old River Road (Grand Avenue - Sullivan Way) and entered Trenton from the southwest." [2] Although the sign does not mention it, General George Washington traveled with Greene's column.

The two columns reached Trenton and made their attack at 8 a.m., where they were victorious at the first Battle of Trenton.

Ewing New Jersey - Revolutionary War Sites
EWING CHURCH CEMETERY
Revolutionary War Veterans Gravesites
Ewing Church Cemetery Ewing NJ

Ewing Church Cemetery
100 Scotch Rd.
Map / Directions to Historic Crossroad Park

The Ewing Church Cemetery dates to 1708, and is still an active cemetery. [3] It contains the graves of the following Revolutionary War veterans: [4]

John Burroughs
(1754 - April 28, 1842)
Sgt.; Hunterdon County Militia

Israel Carle
Captain; Nixon's Company of Horse

Benjamin Clark, Jr.

John Dean
(Died September 11, 1831 )
Captain; Updycke's Co., 2nd Regiment

William Green
(Died October 30, 1815)
Private; Hunterdon County Militia

William B. Green
(July 29, 1762 - January 13, 1847)
Private; Hunterdon County Militia

William R. Green
(Died January 6, 1822)
Private; Captain Mott's Company

John Guild
(Died March 25, 1825)
Private;: Hunterdon County Militia

Benjamin Hendrickson
(Died February 24, 1832)
Sgt.; Captain Tucker's Co.; 1st Regiment

Thomas Hendrickson
(Died July 7, 1822)
Private; Captain Mott's Co.; 1st Regiment

Amos Howell
(Died February 16, 1819)
Wagonmaster; Quartermaster Depot

Daniel Howell
(Died February 27, 1812)
Captain; Captain Mott's Co.; 1st Regiment

Ezekiel Howell

Hezekiah Howell
Hunterdon County Militia

Israel Howell
(January 14, 1758 - April 4, 1787)
Private; Captain Mott's Company; 1st Regiment

John Howell
(Died June 29, 1779)
Private; Hunterdon County Militia

John Howell

Peter Howell
(Died December 14, 1812)
Captain; Carhart's Company; 2nd Regiment

Timothy Howell
Four Horse Team

William Howell
(Died August 27, 1812)
Private; Continental Line

Benjamin Jones

Joshua Jones
(Died 1817)
Private; Continental Line

Ralph Lanning, Jr.
(1759 - 1843)
Private; 1st Regiment; Hunterdon County Militia

Ralph Lanning, Sr.
(1723 - 1800)
1st Lt.; Hunt's Company

Benjamin Moore
(1718 - 1792)
Private; Captain Scott's Co.; 2nd Regiment

Israel Moore
(Died March 4, 1829)
Private; Captain Mott's Company; 1st Regiment

Jesse Moore
(1750 - 1839)
Private; Captain Mott's Company; 1st Regiment

Sackett Moore
(Died January 29, 1820)
Private; Captain Mott's Company; 1st Regiment

William S. Moore
(Died February 3, 1823)
Private; Captain Tucker's Co.; 1st Regiment

Richard Palmer
(Died June 1, 1808)
Teamster/ Captain Durrow Team Brigade

Joseph H. Purdy

Andrew Reeder
Wagonmaster; Hunterdon County Militia
Died September 25, 1784

Isaac Reeder
(Died September 25, 1784)
Wagonmaster; Hunterdon County Militia

John Reeder
Private; Phillips Regiment; NJ Militia

Stephen Rose
Continental Line

Amos Scudder
(Died August 11, 1824)
Ensign; Captain Mott's Company; 1st Reg

Joseph Tindall
(June 13, 1812)
Sgt; Captain Mott's Company; 1st Regiment

Ewing New Jersey - Revolutionary War Sites
HUGH MERCER MONUMENT
Hugh Mercer Monument
Hugh Mercer Monument

General Hugh Mercer Monument
In Front of Mountain View Golf Course /  850 Bear Tavern Rd
Map / Directions to General Hugh Mercer Monument

Hugh Mercer was born in Scotland in 1725. He immigrated to Pennsylvania in 1747 and moved to Virginia in 1760. Mercer served as a Brigadier General in the Revolutionary War. He died from wounds suffered at the Battle of Princeton in January 1777. Several months later, Fort Mercer was named in his honor. In 1838,  decades after the war, Mercer County was named after him. [5]

This monument pays tribute to General Hugh Mercer and commemorates the dedicatory ceremonies of Mercer Airport, held here October 26, 1929. The dedication ceremony was a big event, attended by over 2,000 people. The festivities included a stunt-flying show put on by the U.S. Navy. At that time, the airport hanger was alongside Bear Tavern Road. In 1942, it was moved a short distance, and the entrance is now located a mile southeast of here. The airport is now known as Trenton-Mercer airport. [6]

Ewing New Jersey - Revolutionary War Sites

Source Notes:

1. ^ Plaques erected by the General Mercer Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution

For more information about the crossing of the Delaware River and then Jacobs Creek, see the Hopewell Township page of this website.
   For more information about the Battle of Trenton, see the Trenton page of this website.

For a more detailed account of the march, see:
David Hackett Fischer, Washington's Crossing (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004) Pages 221-233

(The road which is now known as River Road, which runs alongside the Delaware did not exist at the time. It was laid out in 1834)

2. ^ Township of Ewing historic sign.

For a more detailed account of the march, see:
David Hackett Fischer, Washington's Crossing (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004) Pages 221-233

3. ^ Cemetery page of the Ewing Presbyterian Church website

4. ^ List of names drawn from the In Honor of Those Known and Unknown Soldiers of the American Revolution who Rest in this Church Yard stone.
Military and date information drawn from individual grave stones and markers in the cemetery.

5. ^ For more information about the Battle of Princeton, see the Princeton page of this website.
For more information about Fort Mercer, see the National Park page of this website.

6. ^ Jo Ann Tesauro, Ewing Township (Images of America series) (Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 2002) Page 25
Portions of this book are available at Google Books here.
A photo of the original hangar alongside Bear Tavern Road can be seen on page 25 . Pages 26-29 contain other historic photos of the airport.

Revolutionary War New Jersey

Website Researched, Written, Photographed and Designed by Al Frazza
This website, its text and photographs are © 2009 -2017 Al Frazza. All rights reserved.